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Sacramento considers junk food ban

SACRAMENTO - California passed a law banning junk food in public schools 10 years ago and now the city of Sacramento will decide whether to follow suit.

Sacramento City Councilman Kevin McCarty came up with the idea to take the issue to the city council Tuesday night.  He wants sugary sodas and high-fat snacks to be replaced with healthier food, water, milk and juices at city hall, city community centers, parks and city-run after school programs.

"There are consequences for what kids put in their system.  This is not a nanny government issue," McCarty said. "The city of Sacramento and the surrounding area loses $300 million a year because obesity (results) in higher health care costs and lower productivity."

The proposal to ban junk food has sparked a lot of debate.  Chris Baca said, "Whatever is available, people are going to eat,  I think if they're steered toward the right things it's going to help."

Mammography is 'terribly imperfect,' though recommended

WASHINGTON, D.C. - For women today, turning 40 often brings birthday cake and candles. But it also brings a question: Should I get a mammogram?

Until two years ago, medical groups largely agreed women should get annual mammograms beginning at age 40. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a group of doctors who evaluate screening tests, broke ranks by encouraging women to talk to their doctors and make up their own minds.

Yet the debate continues. Though few dispute the facts about mammograms, they often disagree on how women should act on results, says Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society.

Car-safety group: Half of child booster seats pose risks

Car-safety group: Half of child booster seats pose risks

Half of children's car booster seats can't ensure a proper fit with all safety belts, an insurance industry-funded safety group says in a report out today.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said six were so bad that it recommended parents avoid them.

Booster seats, which are recommended for children who have outgrown forward-facing child seats, are designed to raise kids up so adult-size safety belts fit properly.

"Not all boosters are doing that well," says Anne McCartt, the institute's research chief.

Children ages 4-8 in booster seats are 45% less likely to be injured in a crash than those using only seat belts.

Booster seats were rated based on how well they fit the roughly 20 million 4- to 8-year-olds with the lap and shoulder belts in a wide range of vehicles.

IIHS says its ratings are important because it's impossible to tell which booster seats are better just by comparing prices or features.

Car-safety group: Half of child booster seats pose risks

Car-safety group: Half of child booster seats pose risks

Half of children's car booster seats can't ensure a proper fit with all safety belts, an insurance industry-funded safety group says in a report out today.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said six were so bad that it recommended parents avoid them.

Booster seats, which are recommended for children who have outgrown forward-facing child seats, are designed to raise kids up so adult-size safety belts fit properly.

"Not all boosters are doing that well," says Anne McCartt, the institute's research chief.

Children ages 4-8 in booster seats are 45% less likely to be injured in a crash than those using only seat belts.

Booster seats were rated based on how well they fit the roughly 20 million 4- to 8-year-olds with the lap and shoulder belts in a wide range of vehicles.

IIHS says its ratings are important because it's impossible to tell which booster seats are better just by comparing prices or features.